Color My World… A “Retrospectic” Snippet

 

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Exposure, lighting, shadows and geometry. The “algorithm” of the digital camera and the “mind” of the observer. That and more,  all play a part in what we ‘see’ in an image. In this case a glimpse back ten years from our family room, contrasting with the hall (wallpaper long since gone) and the “office.”  

From the “office,” apologies for creating new words,

thanks for viewing and

comments are always welcome. M 🙂

R.I.P JB 😦

 

1920 Ford Model T Touring Car – Grandpa’s First?

 

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1921-00-00-005ABOVE: My grandfather was the photographer, likely in the fall of 1921 near Suffern, New York, as he took his family out for a Sunday drive. That morning started closer to home in Guttenberg, NJ, as seen in the lower picture. Grandma, my father, (age about 11,) and his sisters, (8 1/2 and 7,) were the passengers.

Below: I suspect the “Kerosene oil  carriage side lights” were an option, a nice touch.

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The image above is from the internet and, as a antique, selling for about $70 today. The entire cost of the new car, was about $325. A similar restored version is pictured below.

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Thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

(Feature image tonight:  remembering Gene Cernan from the last lunar landing mission)

1958 Thunderbird – This Guy’s First Car

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Seventeen came with the privilege to drive –  a legal license for  liberation, freedom, wondrous opportunities to explore with friends or a date, and a major lifestyle advantage. But it would take 20 months before I would actually buy my very own car, a  1958 Thunderbird.

Unfortunatly with this particular great looking coupe, I had quickly become owner of an aging, poorly maintined chasis with unsettling grinding sounds, clunks and bumps and  serious (expensive) mechanical failures deemed likely. Bought relativelty inexpensively  for $500, partly financed by my older brother, I parted unscathed with a slight profit a month later.

 But for those few springtime days of happily cleaning and waxing …while ambitious aspirations and fanciful daydreams played along with its radio, this beautiful classic car was mine.

 I wish I had it today.     

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Treasure in Manhattan – Morgan Library & Museum

 

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Located on Madison Ave at E. 36th street,  The Morgan Museum and Research Library containing the private holdings of financier J.P Morgan and other benefactors,  is an incomparable collection of original manuscripts, books, paintings, sculptures, cylinder seals and other fine works of literary and imaginary art, accessible to the public in its grandiose historic setting. 

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From the Rotunda, one enters the three-story Morgan Library, as also seen above.

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dsc_0143Thousands of books in pristine condition, date back centuries. One section contains tens of massive bibles, including the Gutenberg. 

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Apparently no expense was spared, as attested in the detail of the ceiling and skylight of this 1906 Manhattan treasure chest.

Below: A large collection of “Cylindrical Seals” are on display, dating back thousands of years. The cylinder, meticulously engraved, would render a relief image when impressed in a soft medium.

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We enjoyed visiting this museum while in “The City”  last week.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Changing Seasons and Summer Memories

Eleven years ago this week, returning to New Jersey from a business trip to Rhode Island, I stopped by this charming little 19th century coastal community known as Watch Hill, RI. Among the shuttered and closed buildings was this Book and Tackle shop 

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At the time, I wrote of the town’s story and the unique practice of the shop,  its signage asking  patrons to simply take what thay want… and leave a payment under the door.

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Although more extensive, and unwanted development never occured, the Book and Tackle Shop, as seen to the left above, is now gone.

 

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The Seaside Merry-Go-Round stood empty, stripped of its carousel figurines and “summer glow and song.”

🙂 Thanks to Gina for the framed gift. 🙂

..As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Martha’s Vineyard, (Two) – Magnificent Summer Cottages in Oak Bluffs

 

These colorful unique cottages date back to the late nineteenth century within a community of picket fences, pocket parks, and even an outdoor tabernacle. They are found in an intriguing area of shaded narrow streets and pathways ideal for walking.

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In addition to pondering the value of being a house painter in Oak Bluffs, one would be a bit envious of those who choose to rent here; close to shops, restaurants, waterfront parks and the harbor.

Read more on Wikipedia, here.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Martha’s Vineyard – Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

This past week we visited Martha’s Vineyard, a quaint, picturesque island just off the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts 

Overlooking the Gay Head Cliffs, the original lighthouse (circa 1799) was modified several times to LOWER the light as to render it more visible underneath frequent fog. The current brick version dates back to 1855 and was moved a short distance away from the eroding cliffs in 2015.
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Above: The view from atop the lighthouse.
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The beach at the base of the sacred cliff is open to hiking, but protected under modern land treaties of the original Wampanoug tribe, ancestors of whom date back over ten thousand years.

A few more photo highlights of our ~48 hour visit will be posted shortly.

Credits: Wikipedia, The National Park Service, and Wampanoug Tribe info panels.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂