A Few Favorite images

A few previously unpublished images from the archives – or – what to publish when you are a.) too busy, or b.) at wit’s end (end of wits?) to create anything else!

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Sandy Paws guarding the remote – Northern N.J. 5/4/15
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Tyler guarding the goal, N.J. – 4/25/15
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Gull scrounging for food, Seaside Heights boardwalk, NJ – 5/23/15
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Grazing around at the Senior Equine Retirement Farm, near ATCO, NJ – 5/23/15
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Home for the birds and the buzzin’ bees, Jersey Shore – 5/19/15
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Clouds blowing by the moon on a windy night, Jersey Shore – 2/23/15
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West side of Hudson River, Tompkins Cove, NY – 5/29/15
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Optimism by the Hudson River, Tompkins Cove, N.Y. – 5/29/15

Thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

America’s Cup and Crowded Skies – New York

We had the pleasure to see some of the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series in New York Harbor last week-end. With crowds lining both sides of (and on) the Hudson, the unique and expensive racing sailboats were impressive. 

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To please spectators, some of the boats paraded under “fast  tow” on their hydrofoils, as shown here with the team USA “Oracle.”

Overcast skies dominated the first of two days, and racing was limited due to less than acceptable wind. 

DSC_0726Overhead, however, were the ever-present helicopters, offering race coverage and sightseeing perspectives for those fortunate…  or were they? 

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Although it looks worrisome from the camera’s long lens, day in and day out “Air Traffic Control” manages to do a remarkable job of keeping these helicoptors  spaced apart within controlled flight paths – a fact underscored by safety records. 

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I captured the official event photographer as he captured us, from our vantage point below the iconic Colgate Clock, in Jersey City. 

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As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Step up, Step Down, and Round They Go – The Dance of the Electrons, Part Three of Three

From the Ramapo River in New Jersey, To the Crust of the Earth and Beyond

See Part One Here

See Part Two Here

This journey traces our electrical power to its source – in three parts.

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Parts one and two follow the journey from our home in northern New Jersey, to just below the New York State line where this image was taken. A connection with this 138,000 volt transmission line and the moon will be noted at the end of this post.
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From our neighborhood ….along the local distribution grid …and through two sub-stations, we follow about seven miles to where it comes in from New York State, from the north. 
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A few miles further, these towers meet up with others at a significantly larger sub-station which fans transmission lines out in several directions. A primary “incoming” feed, is seen below.
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Probabaly in the 345,000 to 500,000 volt range, the cables on these structures carry serious loads, coming into the  sub-station shown in the previous photo,
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Here is a close-up of two cables bonded together, presumedly at the same alternating current phase, …for those of you who worry about such things. Each is about a closed fist in diameter and insulated only by the air. The larger spiral wires simply hold the cables to the brace.
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Heading south (right in this image,) over hills and valleys from Tomkins Cove, these imposing mono poles transfer the power lines from the western end of the trans-Hudson span (out of sight to the left.) The frame transmission tower in the background is not directly related. 
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Standing some 475 feet (148 m) high and separated by nearly a mile (1.6 km,) these towers carry 500,000 volts or more across the Hudson River….
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The top hand railing seen in both the photo above and those below indicate scale: about 4 feet (1.2 m) high. Note the relative size of the insulators!

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About a mile (1.6 km) left of the eastern tower are the two reactor domes of the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Plant, in Buchanan, New York.
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The magnetic-induction generators within, produce a three phase AC potential of several thousand volts, which is immediatly STEPPED-UP through transformers to the half million to 750,000 volt conductors exiting the plant. The lines coming out of the building  just right of center, and to the transmission tower behind,  mark the start of the transmission lines traced by this series.  Others feed Westchester County and parts of NYC… with significant presence also on the North-East U.S. regional grid.
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Technically: Inside Indian Point. An alternating current is produced in three phases, induced in coils of wire moving in strong magnetic fields within these generators. Relative movement must occur between the magnet assemblies and the coiled wires. The resulting  electromotive force is measured in volts, and leaves the generator first at a few thousand, then stepped up, via powerful  transformers,  to 500,000 to 750,000 volts for transmission… and for our use, sent across the Hudson River!
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The relative movement mentioned above is provided by a shaft directly connected to a steam turbine that spins the magnets, (or visa versa, the coils,) within the generator.  Technical Morass Follows: The steam is is produced in a kettle in which Hudson River water is heated via a water exchanger. That water, which is in a closed system, and highly pressurized, surrounds the reactor vessel where a form of slightly enriched uranium dioxide is fissioned by neutrons (usually under initial coaxing,) releasing heat energy and more neutrons to sustain a controled chain reaction. Spltting atoms!  Uranium “pellets” are bundled as fuel-rod assemblies within the reactors core.  Basic Summary: Simply, heat energy from unranium fission heats river water to make steam that turns the turbines that spin the coils (or magnets) in the generator, producing the dance of electrons –>electricity!
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The rods that fuel the reaction in the reactor’s core is comprised of compressed uranium dioxide pellets, which in turn is processed from uranium – a naturally occuring element in the earth’s crust. Above is a rock sample containing uranium. It is likely this is also part of the moon’s geologic make-up. (Remember the moon?)
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FINALLY, (Thank Goodness,) naturally occuring uranium and the earth itself, with its myraid forms of latent energy, originated as a spin off from our sun 4.5 billion years ago.  For now, and for the purpose of this project, the source of my warmed toast, is…the Sun. It’s all amazing, and amazing how we naturally take the science, (physics, chemistry etc.,) and resourceful human ingenuity …for granted! 

Disclaimer: Not being an electrical engineer or public utility employee, some values may be slightly different than stated, but should give a general idea of the actual grid and electrical generation. Any “system” or statistical corrections will be most appreciated.

With the exception of the I.P.Generator, the diagram and the uranium ore above, all photos in this series were taken by myself. General information, and those three photos are greatly apprieciatiated and obtained from various sources, including the internet. Additional information about this is available if requested.

As usual, thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome. M:-)

NYC’s Radio City Music Hall – The Best of the Best

This Post contains six images, all captured last night, April 18th, 2015

Short on time? Just browse the photos.

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Jeanne and I had not been to this iconic 6000 seat theater in a while, but with the first clear, warm night of the season, we took the ferry across the Hudson, and enjoyed a remarkable “New York Spring Spectacular.”

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The Rockerfeller Center, Radio City Music Hall is known for their precision and awesome dance troupe, the “Rockettes.” They… are backed by the best of the best orchestras, settings, special effects, technical wizardry and talent one could ever experience. 

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Additionally, this production starred Derek Hough (left)and Laura Benanti (right) along with a steller supporting cast.

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A sampling of the staging was this dance number, “Singing in the Rain” during which a torrential rain storm, complete with lightning and thunder, inundated the stage and actors.

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Of course, no Radio City Music Spectacular would be complete without the high stepping Rockettes.

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And, after the show, the Manhattan skyline from the ferry was the nightcap.

If you get a chance to visit NYC, you’ve got to see the Best of the Best, as found here, and in countless other productions on Broadway. We love it! 

Thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Forgotten Roads and Rusting Guardians

Still common in many rural areas, cable and concrete (or wood) posts were the savior of countless vehicles headed for trees and ditches in early and mid 20th Century America.

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Designed to spread the impact forces over the long length of the cables, they reduced injury and saved lives as the cables “gave” and absorbed energy in their stretching and end anchoring systems.

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Recently, I came across these two vestiges in Bergen County, New Jersey, still intact along side their abandoned roads. The first, above, was Fort Lee Road, formerly a minor artery across the Overpeck Meadowlands, just west of the George Washington Bridge. It was displaced by Interstate 95/80 nearly 50 years ago.  

Below is old US Rt. 9W now a walking trail in the State Line Lookout area of Alpine, New Jersey, formerly the only road along the top of the Palisades overlooking the Hudson River, replaced by the current Palisades Interstate Parkway some 60 years ago.

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Thanks for Viewing

As usual, click on the images for high resolution, and …comments are always welcomed.

🙂 

A Word A Week Challenge: Waiting

TRAIN STATION

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A January morning about 5:15 AM, several years back, waiting alone for the eastbound Lakeshore Limited in Buffalo N.Y. and my last employer-funded return home. A long satisfying career entailing countless flights and long road-trips was drawing to a gratifying close, and on this one last segment, I chose to take the train. Truly an occasion of unbridled contentment and satisfaction, my days ahead would be savored slowly with reflection and appreciation starting today, on the rails… making my way home, via Albany, and the scenic Hudson River Line.

Note: Thanks for participation incentive from Milka Pejovic’s post found here, based on “A Word A Week Challenge:” found here.