Fun in Downtown L.A. Then and Now

Family Vacation, 32 years ago. American Airlines 747 from NYC’s Kennedy Airport to LAX. After the image below, is the story of  “Early A.M. in L.A.  on 11/10/87”   

Note: The original posting of this subject became compromised at some point after the original publication date.  Significantly, the “Swiss Army Knife”  and this above early morning view from Griffith Observatory, were omitted. 
Image above: Downtown L.A. – as seen from Griffith Observatory, 11/11/87.   L.A. City Hall to left – 5.6 miles (9 km) distant.
Above, the iconic L.A. City Hall, known at the time as “The Dragnet Building.”

Twelve hours after landing, I would be exploring Los Angeles by foot before the morning’s rush hour, while the family slept off jet-lag in the Holiday Inn about a mile away. An awesome two hour adventure into an “architectually diverse” downtown, with parks and plazas, and… WHAT??? – a Giant Swiss Army Knife???   Yes indeed!  

And, not far away, …Swinging Cars!hi

Years later, and of course living 3000 miles away, I wondered exactly where these two photos were taken. I searched maps, and photos where I could, without success – until now. Thanks to the remarkable 3D satellite image and orientation tools available on most any smart phone and/or computer, I “flew” between the buildings and first found the cars: W. Fourth street, and S. Grand Ave.  See it below?

The Swiss Army knife was a lot harder. In fact, it’s not there anymore. BUT, by looking at the photo I took in 1987, and specifically for the glass pyramid in its background,  I zoomed way in on the “Tom Tom” 3D map, and searched until noticing the glass pyramid structure. Below is from today’s mapping app, zoomed in showing that same glass pyramid. A “new” contempoary display is in the exact place where the knife was 32 years ago. 

Above: The Plaza at The Museum of Contemporary Art, on S. Grand Street, L.A. (From Tom Tom Maps,  Apple I-Pad)

Below, another photo of downtown Los Angeles on that beautiful morning.

Thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome, and zoom in for a closer look. M 🙂

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, 55 Years Ago Today – Part One

October 21, 1964, I was fortunate to be there, …in New York City, walking around the Staten Island side of this brand new and, at that time, longest suspension bridge in the world. In an hour or two the ribbon cutting would facilitate the official opening, and we would be among the first to cross.

“New York’s Finest” on foot, and on motorcycle, as the latter start one final sweep of the roadway just prior to the official opening.

See Part Two, as we prepare to cross the new bridge, which after 2018 became correctly and officially named as the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge with two z’s, finally conforming to the explorer’s actual name.  Giovanni va Verrazzano was the first documented European explorer to sail through this waterway, in 1524! 

Thanks for viewing, zoom in for a closer look on these original 35mm film images, and comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Boscobel and the Hudson River School of Art

Happy New Year

Last week we toured the Boscobel Federalist Mansion near Cold Spring, New York. Below is the view from its front lawn overlooking the Hudson River, …the i-Phone capture reminiscent of a genre of Early American Art from the Hudson River School.   Information on this impressive site can be found at

http://boscobel.org

As always, thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Crooked Tracks – Englewood, N.J.

DSC_0390

This former passenger line, crossing Palisades Ave, in Englewood, NJ and adequately guarded by flashing lights and long crossing gates, would not be a comfortable ride today. Still used for limited light freight, it was originally opened in 1859, providing passenger service for 107 years, till 1966. The re-purposed original station still stands aside the right of way, just behind me in this photograph. Many would welcome the conversion to modernized “Light Rail” for connections to Manhattan, via Hoboken, NJ.

As usual, thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome.  M 🙂

6:45 AM: Griffith Park, LA., The Observatory and the Moon

 

Continuing a theme from my last post, once again we have the last quarter moon hanging above a fairly well known landmark –  the Griffith Observatory and Science Center overlooking Los Angeles. It was day two of a family vacation with a somewhat newer SLR film camera, early in the morning of November 11th, 1987.   

54.041 11-11-87 Los Angeles, Griffith day 2

54.046 11-11-87 Los Angeles, Griffith day 2

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

4:30 AM: Washington DC – The Capitol and the Moon

 The top photo could have been taken last week. But when I stood on the Capitol lawn with the EXA camera, man was yet to step foot on the moon and our president was embroiled in a Southeast Asian war.  The camera was a manual SLR, with something called photographic film, from Kodak. (Admittedly some digital enhancing gave the image just a little more snap than the original snap! 🙂 )

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

The Louvre, Paris – Just a Courtyard

The Louvre Museum was one of the many highlights of our vacation to France back a few years ago. Here, simply, is a view of one courtyard, a small, un-pretensious treaure in itself, and only a few steps away from the “Mona Lisa” and so many other trully celebrated works of art.

(Nikon D80 – f/11 1/500 sec, 18mm, handheld on the go!)

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂