The Piermont Pier

 

           About four weeks ago, in one of our last ventures before the Corvid-19 Pandemic, we visited the little town of Piermont, New York …on the Hudson River, and explored its 182 year old rock and earthen pier, which by 1851 served as a loading and unloading track bed for Erie Railroad trains picking up steamboat passengers from Lower Manhattan, twenty-five miles to the South.  On the then longest rail line in the world, vacationers would travel 450 miles (724 km) to Dunkirk, NY and the shores of  Lake Erie.   Some hundred years later, long after the excursions were outmoded, tens of thousands of WW II troops would depart from this same mile long pier to ferries, and transfer onto troop ships in NY Harbor. Sadly, thousands would literally leave their last footsteps on U.S. soil right here. A monument nearby is solemnly named “Last Stop, USA.”

The Piermont Pier is located about two miles (3.2 km)south of the new Mario Cuomo Bridge, jutting out a little less than one mile (1.61 km) into the Hudson River.
The old steamship/ferry slip from years ago is seen above,  …to the left.
Above: Today, the pier is a commercial, residential, and hiking park.
Remnants of the steamship/ferry docks can still be seen in this 2/23/20 view looking south. New York City would be just beyond Tallman Mountain to the right.
Above: A bollard, used for securing heavy lines, is seen here near the end of the pier, looking south.
Above: The trestle part of the new bridge, carrying the New York State Thruway, is about two miles (3.2 km) to the North; and Hook Mountain, overlooking the Hudson, is seen beyond.
Above: The striking new Governor Mario Cuomo Bridge; and two miles (3.2 km) further, Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse off Tarrytown, NY seen to the left of center span.
Taken some years ago while boating on the Hudson, Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse, also know as Tarrytown Lighthouse or Kingsland Point Lighthouse, was “installed” in 1883.

Thanks for viewing. Zoom in for a closer look.

And a special note: BE WELL, …and please use best judgement practices as we “navigate” through these un-precedented difficult times.    M

I’d like to thank the Piermont Historical Society for their added information concerning this topic, and Wikipedia. I am a proud contributer/donator to both sources.

 

 

 

Swiss Army Knife meets Mt. St. Helens

         Lately, I seem to be hung up on Swiss Army Knives. See here.  Originally, in that post, I wanted to compare the enormous display with my real knife. Unfortunately,  I couldn’t find the knife. But …here it is. I had used it as contrast to the ash from the Mt. St. Helens explosion, nine years earlier.  The two pictures below, from our vacation in August, 1989, were taken on the banks of the Toutle River some 30 miles downstream from the catastrophic event which literally blew the top off the mountain.

ABOVE: A few miles east of the Mt. St. Helens Visitor Center in Washington State, Rt. 504 crosses the Toutle River, (located near “Toutle” on the satellite image below.)  BELOW: Topless Mt. St. Helens is visible from Interstate 5, about 35 miles away.


                    The Visitor Center is between “Castle Rock,” and “Toutle.

                     Thanks for viewing, and zoom in for a closer look. M 🙂

 

 

Rebirth in Great Smokey Mountains, Zoom-in Version

 

There is a wonderful five mile one-way roadway just east of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in the foothills of Mount LeConte, the third highest peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, at 6,923 (2010 m.) The auto turn-outs allow access to old growth forests, streams, waterfalls, wildlife and more. Recently, Sandy Paws and I found unexpected tranquility, and almost complete silence, among the resurgence of forest life, ten months after devastating fires sorched the region.

A short walk from one of the turn-outs, leads to a small summit, elevation 2,900 feet (884 m) as shown photographically in the last picture above, and located on the topo renditions here.

Special thanks to Crow Canyon Journey and Jessica for zoom-in attributes, and Le Conte spelling respectively! M 🙂

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

UTAH: Day Three and Four – Lake Powell, Natural Bridges and Salt Lake City

 

Our four days exploring in Utah, continued early Saturday morning, 11/7/15, at the ‘outpost’ of Bullfrog, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area where we rented a small boat to explore nearby parts of Lake Powell, specifically Moqui Canyon. Later we would view the remarkable terrain in Natural Bridges National Monument, spend the night in Salt Lake City, and fly home Sunday, 11/8/15. 

This post contains 18 images most with comments. Browse through quickly, or click on for higher visual resolution.  

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From our lodge, early morning…houseboats moored at Bullfrog Marina
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One of the last days of the season, there were virtually no other renters despite what I considered perfect weather.
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Easily enduring chilly morning temperatures, the stunning sceanery kept the cameras busy, as Holly focuses here. 
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Seven year old Tyler was no exception.
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Moqui Canyon is one of hundreds of flooded canyons of the Glen Canyon portion of the Colorado River.
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The winding waterway, in just this one “side” canyon, goes on for a number of miles, twisting and turning with one incomparable view after another.

 

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We beached here where Holly, Steve and Tyler climbed and explored, as I relished in the awesome surroundings.
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All three are in this image, as photographed from the boat.
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Steve , camera in hand, explores around the bend.
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The weather today was cool, crisp and perfect; while summertime brings temperatures near 100 deg. F. (38 deg. C.) …with an abundance of houseboats and pleasure craft, many rented for a week at a time or privately owned.
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Steve, Holly and grandson Tyler

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I believe Lake Powell has only three access areas in its 186 mile (299 km) length and 1,960 miles (3,161 km) of shoreline, leaving plenty of exploration room.

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After returning the boat, driving for a few more hours, and seeing virtualy no one on the road, (except  a mounted cowhand coaxing his small herd of cattle,) we explored Natural Bridges National Monument in the later afternoon.
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A spectacular scenic roadway provides viewpoints for several bridges, this being  Kachina, 210 ft. (64 m) high.
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We continued late into the night to Salt Lake City and our room. Sunday morning, day four, 11/8/15, the Wasatch Mountains caught the early sunlight as seen from our hotel (see feature image at top of this post,) and the view above was of the Utah State Capitol building as we headed back to the airport.
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The Colorado Rockies are below our regional jet to Denver, then the long flight home – ending our otherwise short and memorable adventure.

As usual, thanks for viewing and comments are always welcome. M 🙂

UTAH: Great Salt Lake and Wasatch Mts – Day One

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My previous post was a prelude to this short series highlighting our recent four day adventure to Utah. Along with my son, daughter and seven year old grandson, we would experience a memorable, whirlwind adventure.

Please click on any of the images for a closer look.

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My daughter, and grandson on the edge of the Great Salt Lake. She tasted and confirmed the water was indeed… SALTY. The 1700 sq. mile (4400 sq. km) lake is relatively shallow and fish-less. This lookout is from the marina just west of the city. (1:50 PM)
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Passing through Salt Lake City, the pretty Wasatch Mountains dominate the cloud laden South East. We were  heading to Park City. (2:15 PM)
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Park City is a major winter skiing resort and summertime hiking hub.  (3:10 PM)

 

 

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The entire network of ski trails are now accessible right from downtown. This being the “shoulder” season between summer and winter, it’s open for hikers. The first snow of the season is visible on the grass.    (3:17 PM)
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The Wastach Mountains, near Sundance, Utah (4:37 PM)
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A  short distance up a winding alpine road, (Rt. 92,) is the trail head for 11,752 ft. (3580 m.) Mt Timpanogos, a spectacular but difficult 14 mile (22 km) RT climb which I had partially explored and nearly froze on, some years earlier. (5:09 PM)
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The Little Provo River winds through Robert Redford’s charming and impressive lodge in Sundance. It was a little after local sunset. (5:28 PM)
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Warming by the open fire-pit, we would shortly relax with dinner in the lodge and continue another 2 1/2 hours to Moab for the night. 

 

Day two will follow shortly.

Thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome. M 🙂