Rebirth in Great Smokey Mountains, Zoom-in Version

 

There is a wonderful five mile one-way roadway just east of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in the foothills of Mount LeConte, the third highest peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, at 6,923 (2010 m.) The auto turn-outs allow access to old growth forests, streams, waterfalls, wildlife and more. Recently, Sandy Paws and I found unexpected tranquility, and almost complete silence, among the resurgence of forest life, ten months after devastating fires sorched the region.

A short walk from one of the turn-outs, leads to a small summit, elevation 2,900 feet (884 m) as shown photographically in the last picture above, and located on the topo renditions here.

Special thanks to Crow Canyon Journey and Jessica for zoom-in attributes, and Le Conte spelling respectively! M 🙂

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

 Snowy White Egrets – This Morning’s Mini Post

A few quick images from this morning on Barnegat Bay, New Jersey

6:31 AM, muted sunshine. “Here I come. Fishies, look out!!!”

Thirty seconds later…”Walking along, my merry way… Doo de doo!”
 

6:54 AM, clouds over sun. “This is my ‘stalking’ pose…reeaddy to POUNCE!!!”

 Five seconds later… “Yahheeiahhh!” 
 

As usual, thanks for viewing, Comments are demanded…sorry, I mean always welcomed. Click on images for closer view. M 🙂

 

 

America’s Cup 2017 – How The Wealthy Play

Coinciding with our vacation to Bermuda last week, was the America’s Cup Yacht Preliminaries.

As seen from the bow of our cruise ship, Norwegian Breakaway, the America’s Cup Village is seen just behind Celebrity Summit, in Bermuda’s Great Sound.
Over the preceding months and many locations, preliminary races determined the ultimate “challenger” to the current “defender” (USA’s “Oracle.”) Above,  New Zealand’s “Emirates” (in contest with Great Britain’s “Land Rover”) takes the lead with Gibbs Hill Lighthouse in the background, and has now earned that challenger privilege.
The boats have evolved over 147 years, from more conventional sailing yachts, to highly refined and sophisticated racing platforms, now utilizing hydrofoils to significantly reduce drag and increase speed.
Rules prohibit any energy sources other than the sea, air and human input. The helmsman, (see image above) who is ultimately responsible for navigation and articulation of control surfaces under race conditions, must continuously evaluate and decide when and where to guide the boat and how to do it. His hands are on a multi-remote laced steering wheel. Also, as the boat’s direction and roll-attitude changes, the entire crew will run across to the opposite (upper) pontoon to man duplicate stations.  Great theater! 
Just after winning this heat over Land Rover, Emirates is seen here coming down off the foils. The boats often exceed 44 knots (50 mph) in racing.

Although all the 50′ catamarans  are essencially the same, teams have virtually unlimited options as to trimming and power usage, including navigating savvy, and human endurance.  For example, Emirates utilizes bicycle-like human power stations, while Oracle uses the more traditional hand cranked “grinders.”  The science of these vessels and the methods employed are awesome, details of which can be found here .     

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

On The Road to Tobacco Bay, Bermuda


Last week, we cruised to Bermuda from NYC on the 145,000 gross ton Norwegian Breakaway. Day six of this family vacation brought us to St. George via the ferry  and a short walk to Tobacco Bay, on the far north shore for swimming, snorkling and exploring, 

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

Perspectives: A Jersey View of the Always Dynamic Big Apple!

This post contains ten images from “President’s Day” last week, underscoring the dynamics of a magnificently changing Manhattan skyline, driven by decades long, mind-blowing construction.  

dsc_0361 dsc_0370-version-2 dsc_0417 dsc_0477 dsc_0343 dsc_0380 dsc_0383 dsc_0502 dsc_0500 dsc_0442  As Robert Plant once sang: “Ohh, …it makes me wonder…”

Thanks for viewing. Click on or “finger stretch” for a closer look –  and comments are certainly welcome. M 🙂

1920 Ford Model T Touring Car – Grandpa’s First?

 

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1921-00-00-005ABOVE: My grandfather was the photographer, likely in the fall of 1921 near Suffern, New York, as he took his family out for a Sunday drive. That morning started closer to home in Guttenberg, NJ, as seen in the lower picture. Grandma, my father, (age about 11,) and his sisters, (8 1/2 and 7,) were the passengers.

Below: I suspect the “Kerosene oil  carriage side lights” were an option, a nice touch.

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The image above is from the internet and, as a antique, selling for about $70 today. The entire cost of the new car, was about $325. A similar restored version is pictured below.

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Thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

(Feature image tonight:  remembering Gene Cernan from the last lunar landing mission)