Swiss Army Knife meets Mt. St. Helens

         Lately, I seem to be hung up on Swiss Army Knives. See here.  Originally, in that post, I wanted to compare the enormous display with my real knife. Unfortunately,  I couldn’t find the knife. But …here it is. I had used it as contrast to the ash from the Mt. St. Helens explosion, nine years earlier.  The two pictures below, from our vacation in August, 1989, were taken on the banks of the Toutle River some 30 miles downstream from the catastrophic event which literally blew the top off the mountain.

ABOVE: A few miles east of the Mt. St. Helens Visitor Center in Washington State, Rt. 504 crosses the Toutle River, (located near “Toutle” on the satellite image below.)  BELOW: Topless Mt. St. Helens is visible from Interstate 5, about 35 miles away.


                    The Visitor Center is between “Castle Rock,” and “Toutle.

                     Thanks for viewing, and zoom in for a closer look. M 🙂

 

 

Look Through My Window, To the Street(s) Below

Still “Winter Isolated” here in northern New Jersey, this morning I captured this image from our window, reminding me (obliquely?) of the classic Mamas and Papas song of forlorn love in the 1960s, here. And yes …those are still our trees in the foreground!

Thanks for viewing, and maybe even listening. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

 

 

A Northbound Adventure, Part Four – The Long Trip Home

“Lets drive north as far as we can go” Begin Part One –> here.

At 3:35 PM, August 31, 1966, Tom and I, in my Austin Healey Sprite, gazed at the long wooden road-barrier before us, and then made a “U” turn to head home. We had traveled 918 miles (1,477 km,) and on a global scale, changed latitude by 9.1 degrees, or about 1/5 distance to the north pole. Longitude changed by a mere 0.2 degrees, almost straight north.

Re-tracing our route back 21 miles (34 km,) through Chibougamau again, we turned west onto Rt. 58, (Rt. 113,) on what was the only alternate route back the United States.  Information about that road ahead, was sketchy as provided by locals filling our gas tank with fuel.

Above: The barrier (Route du Nord) to Senneterre would be 225 miles (365 km) and take about nine hours to sometime after midnight on a route only about 10% paved. 

Forty minutes after starting on Rt. 58, we passed through Chapais, the last town of any significance and last pavement we would see for hours. This sparsely populated region was home to the local Cree Indian communities, (see here)  known as the Waswanipi.

Pausing at this bridge just before sunset in the town of Waswanipi, the road would deteriorate considerably after this crossing.

A grueling four or five dusty hours would follow as we moved on into the night. Traveling virtually alone under the northern stars, seeing only a rare passing vehicle, amenities like fuel and light food were available only every 40 or 50 miles (64 or 80 km), although typically for us, a simple request like “ice cream” would prove a bit challenging when asking the well-meaning French-speaking Waswanipi. 

Every few hours, Tom and I switched drivers, but the primitive road made sleep fleeting at best for the passenger. Having to occasionally pitch in and help free the Sprite from being  bogged down in soft ruts proved a little distracting to any kind of worthwhile rest. These conditions were particularly challenging during the last 125 miles (201 km) with our progress restricted to often under 25 mph (40 km.) The welcome return to pavement would finally come near the town of Senneterre, as we continued south just after midnight.

In the following late-night hours, we would drive an additional 100 miles (161 km) along the paved road within La Verendrye Provincial Park, and sunrise would occur shortly later as we reached populated areas about 50 miles (80 km) from Ottawa, Canada.

Above: 9:30 AM, approaching the St. Lawrence River at Cornwall, Ontario, and the bridge back into the United States. 

Below: From the bridge, a good view of the locks and Eisenhower Power Plant on the river below, 1,500 miles (2,414 km) into the trip.

As the air warmed, the top came off the car once more as it would be an additional 11 hours of daytime driving through New York State, including a slight detour to Oneonta, a college town where Tom would shortly be beginning his next year of studies.  

Note the modern-day Google “travel time” above is based on paved roads, 53 years after the actual 28.5 hours on primitive roads in 1966.

 

At about 8:00 PM that evening, we would be back in Bergenfield after 1,957 total miles (3,150 km) in slightly less than three days.

Our final northern-most point was only about 6 miles (9.5 km) west of directly north, the basic objective of going north as far as we could go by car.

Below: Lat 40.9 deg., Long -74.0       Above: Lat 50.01 deg., Long -74.19

As usual, comments are always welcome. Most images can be enlarged with tapping of finger stretching. Thanks to Google Maps and Wikipedia for certain images and information used for this series. M 🙂

 

 

Treasure in Manhattan – Morgan Library & Museum

 

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Located on Madison Ave at E. 36th street,  The Morgan Museum and Research Library containing the private holdings of financier J.P Morgan and other benefactors,  is an incomparable collection of original manuscripts, books, paintings, sculptures, cylinder seals and other fine works of literary and imaginary art, accessible to the public in its grandiose historic setting. 

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From the Rotunda, one enters the three-story Morgan Library, as also seen above.

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dsc_0143Thousands of books in pristine condition, date back centuries. One section contains tens of massive bibles, including the Gutenberg. 

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Apparently no expense was spared, as attested in the detail of the ceiling and skylight of this 1906 Manhattan treasure chest.

Below: A large collection of “Cylindrical Seals” are on display, dating back thousands of years. The cylinder, meticulously engraved, would render a relief image when impressed in a soft medium.

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We enjoyed visiting this museum while in “The City”  last week.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

To The Beach – Before the First Chill of Autumn

Last week, already nearly a week into autum, we had our last visit to the beach just before days of rains and near 50 mph winds raked the area.  A brief ride across the bay here brought us to Island Beach State Park, the New Jersey barrier island with its boardwalk to the ocean. 

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Except for the banner, these are captured from my i-phone.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

The Last Vestiges of Winter?

Downstream of Ramapo Lake, New Jersey

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Ice and snow yield to the advancing season.
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The fragile ice – from a slightly different angle as seen also in the first image, upper right.
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Images taken by MacEvoy Trail, 24.2 miles NE of the Empire State Building, in OAKLAND, NEW JERSEY

…As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂