A Northbound Adventure, Part Four – The Long Trip Home

“Lets drive north as far as we can go” Begin Part One –> here.

At 3:35 PM, August 31, 1966, Tom and I, in my Austin Healey Sprite, gazed at the long wooden road-barrier before us, and then made a “U” turn to head home. We had traveled 918 miles (1,477 km,) and on a global scale, changed latitude by 9.1 degrees, or about 1/5 distance to the north pole. Longitude changed by a mere 0.2 degrees, almost straight north.

Re-tracing our route back 21 miles (34 km,) through Chibougamau again, we turned west onto Rt. 58, (Rt. 113,) on what was the only alternate route back the United States.  Information about that road ahead, was sketchy as provided by locals filling our gas tank with fuel.

Above: The barrier (Route du Nord) to Senneterre would be 225 miles (365 km) and take about nine hours to sometime after midnight on a route only about 10% paved. 

Forty minutes after starting on Rt. 58, we passed through Chapais, the last town of any significance and last pavement we would see for hours. This sparsely populated region was home to the local Cree Indian communities, (see here)  known as the Waswanipi.

Pausing at this bridge just before sunset in the town of Waswanipi, the road would deteriorate considerably after this crossing.

A grueling four or five dusty hours would follow as we moved on into the night. Traveling virtually alone under the northern stars, seeing only a rare passing vehicle, amenities like fuel and light food were available only every 40 or 50 miles (64 or 80 km), although typically for us, a simple request like “ice cream” would prove a bit challenging when asking the well-meaning French-speaking Waswanipi. 

Every few hours, Tom and I switched drivers, but the primitive road made sleep fleeting at best for the passenger. Having to occasionally pitch in and help free the Sprite from being  bogged down in soft ruts proved a little distracting to any kind of worthwhile rest. These conditions were particularly challenging during the last 125 miles (201 km) with our progress restricted to often under 25 mph (40 km.) The welcome return to pavement would finally come near the town of Senneterre, as we continued south just after midnight.

In the following late-night hours, we would drive an additional 100 miles (161 km) along the paved road within La Verendrye Provincial Park, and sunrise would occur shortly later as we reached populated areas about 50 miles (80 km) from Ottawa, Canada.

Above: 9:30 AM, approaching the St. Lawrence River at Cornwall, Ontario, and the bridge back into the United States. 

Below: From the bridge, a good view of the locks and Eisenhower Power Plant on the river below, 1,500 miles (2,414 km) into the trip.

As the air warmed, the top came off the car once more as it would be an additional 11 hours of daytime driving through New York State, including a slight detour to Oneonta, a college town where Tom would shortly be beginning his next year of studies.  

Note the modern-day Google “travel time” above is based on paved roads, 53 years after the actual 28.5 hours on primitive roads in 1966.

 

At about 8:00 PM that evening, we would be back in Bergenfield after 1,957 total miles (3,150 km) in slightly less than three days.

Our final northern-most point was only about 6 miles (9.5 km) west of directly north, the basic objective of going north as far as we could go by car.

Below: Lat 40.9 deg., Long -74.0       Above: Lat 50.01 deg., Long -74.19

As usual, comments are always welcome. Most images can be enlarged with tapping of finger stretching. Thanks to Google Maps and Wikipedia for certain images and information used for this series. M 🙂

 

 

Treasure in Manhattan – Morgan Library & Museum

 

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Located on Madison Ave at E. 36th street,  The Morgan Museum and Research Library containing the private holdings of financier J.P Morgan and other benefactors,  is an incomparable collection of original manuscripts, books, paintings, sculptures, cylinder seals and other fine works of literary and imaginary art, accessible to the public in its grandiose historic setting. 

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From the Rotunda, one enters the three-story Morgan Library, as also seen above.

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dsc_0143Thousands of books in pristine condition, date back centuries. One section contains tens of massive bibles, including the Gutenberg. 

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Apparently no expense was spared, as attested in the detail of the ceiling and skylight of this 1906 Manhattan treasure chest.

Below: A large collection of “Cylindrical Seals” are on display, dating back thousands of years. The cylinder, meticulously engraved, would render a relief image when impressed in a soft medium.

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We enjoyed visiting this museum while in “The City”  last week.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

To The Beach – Before the First Chill of Autumn

Last week, already nearly a week into autum, we had our last visit to the beach just before days of rains and near 50 mph winds raked the area.  A brief ride across the bay here brought us to Island Beach State Park, the New Jersey barrier island with its boardwalk to the ocean. 

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Except for the banner, these are captured from my i-phone.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

The Last Vestiges of Winter?

Downstream of Ramapo Lake, New Jersey

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Ice and snow yield to the advancing season.
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The fragile ice – from a slightly different angle as seen also in the first image, upper right.
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Images taken by MacEvoy Trail, 24.2 miles NE of the Empire State Building, in OAKLAND, NEW JERSEY

…As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

UTAH: Day Three and Four – Lake Powell, Natural Bridges and Salt Lake City

 

Our four days exploring in Utah, continued early Saturday morning, 11/7/15, at the ‘outpost’ of Bullfrog, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area where we rented a small boat to explore nearby parts of Lake Powell, specifically Moqui Canyon. Later we would view the remarkable terrain in Natural Bridges National Monument, spend the night in Salt Lake City, and fly home Sunday, 11/8/15. 

This post contains 18 images most with comments. Browse through quickly, or click on for higher visual resolution.  

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From our lodge, early morning…houseboats moored at Bullfrog Marina
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One of the last days of the season, there were virtually no other renters despite what I considered perfect weather.
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Easily enduring chilly morning temperatures, the stunning sceanery kept the cameras busy, as Holly focuses here. 
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Seven year old Tyler was no exception.
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Moqui Canyon is one of hundreds of flooded canyons of the Glen Canyon portion of the Colorado River.
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The winding waterway, in just this one “side” canyon, goes on for a number of miles, twisting and turning with one incomparable view after another.

 

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We beached here where Holly, Steve and Tyler climbed and explored, as I relished in the awesome surroundings.
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All three are in this image, as photographed from the boat.
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Steve , camera in hand, explores around the bend.
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The weather today was cool, crisp and perfect; while summertime brings temperatures near 100 deg. F. (38 deg. C.) …with an abundance of houseboats and pleasure craft, many rented for a week at a time or privately owned.
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Steve, Holly and grandson Tyler

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I believe Lake Powell has only three access areas in its 186 mile (299 km) length and 1,960 miles (3,161 km) of shoreline, leaving plenty of exploration room.

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After returning the boat, driving for a few more hours, and seeing virtualy no one on the road, (except  a mounted cowhand coaxing his small herd of cattle,) we explored Natural Bridges National Monument in the later afternoon.
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A spectacular scenic roadway provides viewpoints for several bridges, this being  Kachina, 210 ft. (64 m) high.
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We continued late into the night to Salt Lake City and our room. Sunday morning, day four, 11/8/15, the Wasatch Mountains caught the early sunlight as seen from our hotel (see feature image at top of this post,) and the view above was of the Utah State Capitol building as we headed back to the airport.
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The Colorado Rockies are below our regional jet to Denver, then the long flight home – ending our otherwise short and memorable adventure.

As usual, thanks for viewing and comments are always welcome. M 🙂

UTAH: Day Two, 11/6/15 – Arches, Canyons and Dinasours

With my son Steve, daughter Holly, and seven year old grandson Tyler we spent the night in Moab, and were beginning our first full day. Now we were in the heart of the Colorado Plateau (Utah,) one of the most impressive scupltured and gorged terrains in the world.

This post contains 21 images.

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK – MORNING:

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NEXT: COLORADO RIVER SCENIC BYWAY, RT. 297 – MID DAY

The series below

These 500 foot (150m.) cliffs, right along the river, offer climbers world class rock faces.

A little further, my grandson leads the way to a fallen strata slab exposing nearly 200 million year old dinosaur tracks…AWESOME! Talk about being in his climbing glory!

Further above the tracks, Tyler “discovers” petroglyphs on the cliff faces, and uncle Steve confirms the sighting.

NOTE: PLEASE SCROLL DOWN AFTER THE BLANK AREAS ABOVE AND BELOW THE SECOND IMAGE BELOW> THE WORDPRESS EDITOR IS BEING PERSNICKETY, AND I WANT TO PUBLISH THIS BEFORE I DIE!

Along trhe Colorado River, Utah
Along the Colorado River, Potash Road, Rt. 297

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Utah
Rock Climbing

 

 

 

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NEXT: CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK – LATE AFTERNOON to SUNSET:

The Series Below

Incomparable switchbacks of the Shafer Trail dropping 1400 feet (426 m.) from the Caynyonlands “Island in the Sky” Mesa

The mesas to the south-east, and snow topped La Sal Mountains beyond

Holly and Tyler

the forth image below, there is a car visible just below and right of center, way down on the 100 mile long White Rim Trail, ringing the “Island” Mesa.

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NEXT:  BULLFROG MARINA, GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA:

Under a million stars, it took five hours on virtually isolated roads to to reach our stay for the night. It was around 11:00 PM in Bullfrog, an outpost at this time of the year where the sky is virtully void of “light pollution.” This slightly wide angle picture was taken at an exposure to approximate the actual experience. It shows the winter Milky Way. Also the Andromeda Galaxy (M 31,) is visible just right and below center, some two million LY distant.  Here, in this dark, moonless sky, naked eye oservers might be able to see another galaxy, elusive M33, which is also in this image, although very faint, just right of center, 1/10 up from bottom. A star cluster known as the “Double Cluster,” is to the left.

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The last two days of our four day adventuere will be posted around 12/6/15

As ususal, thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcomed.  M:-)