The Piermont Pier

 

           About four weeks ago, in one of our last ventures before the Corvid-19 Pandemic, we visited the little town of Piermont, New York …on the Hudson River, and explored its 182 year old rock and earthen pier, which by 1851 served as a loading and unloading track bed for Erie Railroad trains picking up steamboat passengers from Lower Manhattan, twenty-five miles to the South.  On the then longest rail line in the world, vacationers would travel 450 miles (724 km) to Dunkirk, NY and the shores of  Lake Erie.   Some hundred years later, long after the excursions were outmoded, tens of thousands of WW II troops would depart from this same mile long pier to ferries, and transfer onto troop ships in NY Harbor. Sadly, thousands would literally leave their last footsteps on U.S. soil right here. A monument nearby is solemnly named “Last Stop, USA.”

The Piermont Pier is located about two miles (3.2 km)south of the new Mario Cuomo Bridge, jutting out a little less than one mile (1.61 km) into the Hudson River.
The old steamship/ferry slip from years ago is seen above,  …to the left.
Above: Today, the pier is a commercial, residential, and hiking park.
Remnants of the steamship/ferry docks can still be seen in this 2/23/20 view looking south. New York City would be just beyond Tallman Mountain to the right.
Above: A bollard, used for securing heavy lines, is seen here near the end of the pier, looking south.
Above: The trestle part of the new bridge, carrying the New York State Thruway, is about two miles (3.2 km) to the North; and Hook Mountain, overlooking the Hudson, is seen beyond.
Above: The striking new Governor Mario Cuomo Bridge; and two miles (3.2 km) further, Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse off Tarrytown, NY seen to the left of center span.
Taken some years ago while boating on the Hudson, Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse, also know as Tarrytown Lighthouse or Kingsland Point Lighthouse, was “installed” in 1883.

Thanks for viewing. Zoom in for a closer look.

And a special note: BE WELL, …and please use best judgement practices as we “navigate” through these un-precedented difficult times.    M

I’d like to thank the Piermont Historical Society for their added information concerning this topic, and Wikipedia. I am a proud contributer/donator to both sources.

 

 

 

1813 Turnpike – Stone Arch Bridge

On a road trip in Pennsylvania last week, we came across a 207 year-old bridge spanning “Jacks Creek” in Lewiston, (located roughly in the center of each map image below.) It was constructed as part of the increasingly important “Harrisburg to Pittsburgh Turnpike.

Thanks for viewing and comments are always welcome. Zoom in for a closer look. M 🙂

Autumn 2019, At The Edge Of The Bay

Above: Drainage canal in the Forsythe Wildlife Rufuge, with “Island Beach (Barrier Island) State Park” 3 mi. (4.8 km) across Barnegat Bay
Above, Empty Osprey nest after successful mating and three new chicks off to winter habitats.
Above: A few minutes later, as seen in the far right, second image  …the town of Barnegat Light, New Jersey, (Long Beach Island (LBI)) and its 160 year old historic lighthouse, 5.2 mi (8.4 km) distant.

 

Thanks for viewing, comments are always welcome, and zoom in for a closer look. M 🙂

Martha’s Vineyard, (Two) – Magnificent Summer Cottages in Oak Bluffs

 

These colorful unique cottages date back to the late nineteenth century within a community of picket fences, pocket parks, and even an outdoor tabernacle. They are found in an intriguing area of shaded narrow streets and pathways ideal for walking.

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In addition to pondering the value of being a house painter in Oak Bluffs, one would be a bit envious of those who choose to rent here; close to shops, restaurants, waterfront parks and the harbor.

Read more on Wikipedia, here.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Martha’s Vineyard – Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

This past week we visited Martha’s Vineyard, a quaint, picturesque island just off the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts 

Overlooking the Gay Head Cliffs, the original lighthouse (circa 1799) was modified several times to LOWER the light as to render it more visible underneath frequent fog. The current brick version dates back to 1855 and was moved a short distance away from the eroding cliffs in 2015.
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Above: The view from atop the lighthouse.
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The beach at the base of the sacred cliff is open to hiking, but protected under modern land treaties of the original Wampanoug tribe, ancestors of whom date back over ten thousand years.

A few more photo highlights of our ~48 hour visit will be posted shortly.

Credits: Wikipedia, The National Park Service, and Wampanoug Tribe info panels.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments are always welcome. M 🙂

 

Lucy, the Inhabitable Elephant – Margate City, NJ

DSC_0548DSC_0567DSC_0549DSC_0578DSC_0580DSC_0550Recently, we climbed up the leg of this 65′ (20m) landmark to its surprisingly roomy interior, built in 1881 as a real estate promotion on the beach.  “Lucy” is located a few miles SW of Atlantic City, as seen from the “howdah” on top.  Refurbished some years ago, it is both remarkable, and ….silly – but worth the visit. 

 Cick on any image for a closer look.

Comments are always encouraged  and thanks for viewing. M 🙂