NYC from the Hudson River – Exceptional Lighting

Back last year, while returning by ferry from a day-trip to Manhattan, the lighting was awesome. Being the busy Christmas season of 2016, these images were saved in my computer until… now! Storms to the north and the late afternoon sun brightly shinning in the south-west accentuated the stunning view.

As usual, click on the image for a closer look, and thanks for viewing. Comments and questions are always welcome.   M 🙂

Roosevelt Island Tramway – New York City

Thanks to our friend Jessica, a resident of remarkable Roosevelt Island, Jeanne and I enjoyed riding The Roosevelt Tramway located just north of the Queens Mid-Town Bridge, aka the 59th Street Bridge, aka the Ed Koch Bridge. This Post contains nine random images from this past Saturday.

DSC_0453 - Version 2 DSC_0442 DSC_0441 DSC_0437 DSC_0436 DSC_0432 DSC_0417 DSC_0399

As usual, thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome M 🙂

After walking the Brooklyn Bridge, 3/27/95

 A follow-up from my previous post about the Brooklyn Bridge, found here.

Just off the Brooklyn Bridge, is the 40 story Manhattan Municipal Building,  on the National Register of Historic Places. A magnificent structure with intriguing interior design elements complementing its Beaux-Arts architecture, topped by columns and cupolas, and …an impressive guilded copper statue:  “City Fame.” 

80.114     3-27-95   City Hall, NYC

Back in 1995, I was fortunate to see these features up close, but as was typical for those days, my camera was out of film. 

80.116     3-27-95   Very top of City Hall from Brooklyn Bridge
Picture taken from Brooklyn Bridge, 1995, Canon Rebel, SLR 200mm telephoto

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However, 15 years earlier, in 1980,  I had photographed the Brooklyn and Manhatten bridges from the World Trade Center, as seen below.

38.076  8-17-80      NYC Daytrip, Top of World Trade Center, H, J, S and M (7)_edited-1

38.075  8-17-80      NYC Daytrip, Top of World Trade Center, H, J, S and M (6)_edited-1
The Manhattan Municipal Building would be just out of view to the left, at about the same height as the white “former” AT&T building shown here.

 As usual,. thanks for visiting, and comments are always welcome. M:-)

Walking the Brooklyn Bridge, NYC – Twenty Years Ago Today

Lacking an idea for a subject, (sharing every week or two is my usual routine,) I arbitrarily looked into my archives for today’s date and ultimately came across the following – on March 27th, 1995.  

This post contains eight photos.

Short on time? just scroll down and click on the images….and as usual, comments are always welcome. 

80.097             3-27-95   Brooklyn Bridge and Woolworth Building
From the Brooklyn side, looking back at the Woolworth Building on the left, once the tallest building in NYC.

My career had me working “on the road” that day at the NY Post Production plant in Manhattan, then located just north of the bridge. After, I took advantage of the beautiful day and walked across the iconic structure.

80.103     3-27-95     Intricate Brooklyn Bridge cables
From this vantage among the web like cables, the Twin Towers stand to the left, doomed to fall 6 1/2 years later on 9/11/11
80.110     3-27-05   Brooklyn Bridge webbing north side
On my Canon Rebel (film) SLR, I used a polarizing filter to bring up the contrast a bit, as these intricate patterns were awesome against the clear blue skies.
80.109.1  3-27-95   Main cable, Brooklyn Bridge
There are four primary cables stretched over the two towers. I love the simple but obviously adequate design of the drop cable’s attachments, shown here. 

Just imagine the forces (weight) sustained by these components!

80.090.1          3-27-95   Manhatten and brooklyn Bridges
In this close up view of a load cable and crossing “stabilizing” cable, the Manhattan Bridge is seen beyond,  completed in 1909, 25 years after the Brooklyn Bridge.
80.091.1          3-27-95  WTC from Brooklyn Bridge
With the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in the background, various “working lines” of the Brooklyn Bridge steadfastly remain taut after 104 years at the time of this photo – 129 years today.
80.087.1         3-27-95   Lamp and Woolworth from BB
Opened to the public in 1913, the Woolworth Building stands about 3 times taller, seen here with one of the bridge’s lampposts in the foreground.

80.082            3-27-95     Brooklyn Bridge Plaque

After completing this walk, I explored the City Hall Building just off the Manhattan side of the bridge, finding easy access to the rotunda on top with its awesome view of lower Manhattan. 

Thanks as usual for viewing. M 🙂

The Day After a Night to Remember – Returning Home

See first part: “A Night to Remember” here

Click on images and maps for better view

It was January 23rd, 1965, and I had driven through the night in a winter snowstorm from New Jersey to Niagara Falls in my parents 1960 Buick.01-23-65    Marty's Niagara Falls trip 19

After seeing and photographing the falls, I continued north, first on the Canadian side, and then back in the U.S., to the mouth of the Niagara River where it flows into Lake Ontario. Heading home now, the first 30 miles or so on Rt. 18, along the lake’s southern edge, was magical …the road virtually deserted as the high winds whipped falling and drifting snow across its breath. I loved the adventure. (See end of first part for more “frigid”comments on this stretch)

Screen Shot 2015-03-12 at 4.54.44 PM
The Niagara River (left) flows north into Lake Ontario (top.) I would take Rt. 18, thirty miles (48 km) along the edge of the lake to Rt. 63, then down to Batavia, and Rt. 5 east to Avon (right bottom on this 2015 Google map,) turning south on Rt. 15 towards Bath, NY.

The image below was taken around 4:00 PM before running out of film and daylight near Avon, The snow continued to fall, although more lightly, into this second night.

01-24-65    Marty's Niagara Falls trip

I stayed overnight in a decent $8 motel in Bath, leaving at about 10:30 AM the next morning with frozen hands after cleaning off the snow covered car.

Continuing southeast on Rt. 15 brought me to to nearby Savona, where I turned left onto Rt. 226 with the anticipation of passing through Watkins Glen, noted for its automotive race track, and for me particularly, its famous 400 foot deep natural gorge and waterfalls. See this link. Seeing the gorge was not to happen. In fact I was lucky to get anywhere near it. Being a bit self assured, (think: cocky,) I didn’t mind the snow covered conditions of the back roads. But at Tyrone, (upper right in the first map below,  left of center in the second) I was determined to take a more direct route, turning right off State Rt. 226, onto Schuylar County Rt. 23 (not labeled.)  

Screen Shot 2015-03-12 at 5.00.47 PM
This topographic map, dated 1968, does not include Interstate Highway 380 which didn’t exist at the time of this road-trip. Eventually It  would vastly improve travel in New York State, as Rt 15 was out-dated, and one of the original 1926 US Highways.
Screen Shot 2015-03-12 at 3.54.32 PM
My adventure on County Road Rt. 24 started at it’s junction with State Road 226, (just above the label “Tyrone” above, left of center.) I was trying to go east (right) from this point, but could not make it up Huey Hill. Watkins Glen is in the bottom right corner. 

It should be mentioned that the ‘few miles wide’ ridges between New York’s Finger Lakes rise from a few hundred feet to about 1000 feet (3050 m) above the lakes. Watkins Glen was on Seneca Lake over one of these ridges, and Huey Hill was in my way. Starting from the intersection at the bottom, I was able to reach about 40 mph (64 kmh) before losing traction on the hill. But I just couldn’t make it to the top. I backed the Buick down and tried again, gaining only a few more feet. The third time, with more initial speed, ended in similiar defeat as the tires just could not maintain their grip on the snowy surface. I felt I was in control, but the “slide-o-matic” Buick just couldn’t maintain any further, upward-forward traction! (Of course, 4 wheel drive, good tires and posi-traction would have helped.)  Today (2015) I know it was 1.8 miles (2.9 km) from the intersection to the top with a vertical gain of about 600 feet (1830 m.)

Sulking a bit, it took me a while more to get to Watkins Glen by a much longer, gradually climbing (and descending) state road.   And then, upon arrival, the Watkins Glen State Park was closed! I think I was a little relieved.

After 7 more hours, at 7:30 PM, I was back in New Jersey after nearly 1000 miles over about 47 hours, and expenses of about $46.

Immediatly after, my Dad and I had a  “conversation!”

Just another interesting week-end. 

2013-09-24 at 12-43-06

The camera: a 1960 Exacta (EXA) 35 mm manual SLR, f2.8 50 mm lens.    Body composition: finger-freezing metal!

As usual, thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcome.  M 🙂

Mid-day Sun Disappears on Cloudless Day – Total Eclipse, 45 Years Ago

March 7th, 1970: Jeanne and I, now engaged, traveled to Virginia Beach, Va., to see a rare total eclipse of the sun, 

Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 9.26.36 AM
We chose to drive down the Jersey Shore; across the Delaware Bay by ferry; through the sparsly populated Del-Mar-Va Peninsula; across the recently opened 17 mile Chesepeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel to Norfolk, and then over to Virginia Beach to be in the center of the several-mile wide “path of totality,” or shadow of the moon.

As the the partial phase began, hundreds of spectators were already in place with telescopes, cameras, and blankets! (The cold Atlantic Ocean is to the left.)12.044     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1

Below: Using eye protection, viewers carefully watched as the moon slid across the sun, casting an eerie pale on the beach, which just a while earlier was bathed in brilliant sunshine. Note the twilight-like coloring near the horizon. This was about 1:00 PM12.048     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1 - Version 2

Below: The moments before totality were enhanced by silence from usually gabby shorebirds.12.060     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1

My equipment was laughable, and getting “text book” images was not to happen. But except for a slight double image, this was what appeared a second before totality – a pheneomena called Baily’s Beads, where the last rays of the sun pass through the mountain valleys and topography of the moon.12.061     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1

The Corona, not ordinarily visible, is the plasma atmosphere of the sun. It is seen here with the sun totally blocked by the moon.12.064     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1

Jeanne, tolerant of my varied and questionable interests, would put that to the test in the next few hours as restauranteurs did not anticipate the overwhelming flow of hungry travelers up the Eastern Shore later that afternoon. Finding a place to EAT was an unanticipated challenge.12.079     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-1

A 10x “finder scope” with Neutral Density filter strapped to an  EXA SLR – on a flimsy tripod proved interesting, but inadequate. It was only matched by my lack of experience in better capturing this event.  12.082     3-7-70    Solar Exclipse Trip, Norfolk, Virginia._edited-2

The filter needed to be removed for the total phase, which lasted an unusually long 3 minutes.

In a little under 24 hours, Jeanne and I drove about 800 miles in our 1967 MGB-GT to see the eclipse. Couldn’t get much better! 

12.086     3-14-70 Jersey City, MGB-GT and Jeanne, probable date_edited-1

Final Note: There are usually several total solar eclipses visible somewhere on earth every year, but the next one passing  along the Eastern US would be 54 years later, in…2024. A MAJOR correction here: 8/21/17 will see a TSE stretching across the US exiting off the South Carolina coast. 

Thanks for viewing, and comments are always welcomed. M 🙂